ZonMw tijdlijn Open Access https://www.zonmw.nl/ Het laatste nieuws van de tijdlijn van Open Access en-gb Tue, 19 Oct 2021 07:11:25 +0200 Tue, 19 Oct 2021 07:11:25 +0200 TYPO3 news-7668 Tue, 07 Sep 2021 10:03:00 +0200 More than 80% of publications funded by NWO and ZonMw Open Access https://www.zonmw.nl/nl/actueel/nieuws/detail/item/more-than-80-of-publications-funded-by-nwo-and-zonmw-open-access/ In 2020, 85% of the publications resulting from NWO funded research were Open Access. For ZonMw, this percentage is 83%. These are the findings from the biennial Open Access Monitor carried out by CWTS at the request from NWO. NWO and ZonMw are strongly committed to the transition to Open Science. Since the introduction of NWO's Open access policy in 2009, great progress has been made. NWO and ZonMw continue to strive for 100% Open access to publications and for research data to be shared according to the maxim “as open as possible as, closed as necessary”.

The main findings of the CWTS-report are:

  • Of the articles published in 2020 arising from NWO funding, 85% are openly accessible: either through the publisher's platforms (gold route) or through a repository (green route). For ZonMw this figure is 83%. That’s an increase of 17% and 23% respectively, since the previous monitor in 2018.
  • The proportion of publications in full gold journals as well as the number of publications in hybrid journals is increasing. The latter as a result of the VSNU's successful Open access agreements with large and medium-sized publishers.
  • In terms of the overall Open access score, there are no major differences between universities. Between disciplines, however, there are differences in the preferred routes. Researchers in the natural sciences tend to choose the green route more often. In the biomedical sciences, publishing in full gold open access is more common.

Caroline Visser, responsible for Open Science in NWO’s  Executive Board of NWO: "It is fantastic that 85% of the research funded by NWO is now openly available. Open Science leads to increased findability and visibility of research results and therefore to more impact, both in science and society. In collaboration with the Dutch universities and medical centers, we have achieved a lot and although - as often - the last steps may be the most difficult, we continue to strive for 100%. And that is realistic. After all, sharing an article via a repository is always an option. We are also going to put more effort into monitoring the compliance with our Open access requirements".  

“As research funders, Open Access is important to us,” adds Jeroen Geurts, Chair of the board of ZonMw and member of the board of NWO, “because it increases the impact of research, improves quality due to transparency, and promotes international collaboration. That is why we set requirements for the research we fund. But we are also taking steps to help researchers do this. That is why, on 1 April of this year, NWO and ZonMw became members of Europe PMC (PubMed Central), an Open Science platform that maintains a worldwide collection of scientific articles and other research results. Researchers from NWO and ZonMw-funded research in the field of life and medical sciences can now share their publications with a worldwide audience in one central place. This membership of Europe PMC is the next step towards 100% Open Access publishing”.

Open Science is the movement that stands for research practices that are more open and participatory, wherein publications, data, software and other forms of scientific information are shared at the earliest possible stage and made openly available for reuse. Open Science leads to more impact, both on science and on society. NWO and ZonMw believe that publicly funded research should be openly available and therefore actively contribute to the transition to Open Science. In that context, they both joined cOAlition S in 2019, a consortium of international research funders with the aim to accelerate the transition to 100% Open Access. NWO's Plan S-based Open Access policy entered into effect as of January 1, 2021.

More information

 

 

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news-6808 Tue, 19 Jan 2021 11:30:00 +0100 Access for researchers to worldwide open access publishing platform https://www.zonmw.nl/nl/actueel/nieuws/detail/item/access-for-researchers-to-worldwide-open-access-publishing-platform/ On 1 April 2021, NWO and ZonMw will become members of Europe PMC (PubMed Central), an open science platform that maintains a worldwide collection of scientific articles and other research output. This membership allows NWO and ZonMw funded researchers in the life sciences and medical sciences to globally share their publications via one central location. With this, they will also satisfy the requirements that NWO and ZonMw set for the research projects they fund: making publications openly accessible immediately. Europe PMC is one of the largest open access platforms and is the European mirror version of the American PubMed Central (PMC) that is used throughout the world. For example, Europe PMC contains 6.6 million full articles and 38.1 million abstracts, including those from PubMed and PubMed Central (PMC). Whereas PubMed provides access to abstracts and PMC to full articles, Europe PMC provides online access to a worldwide collection of abstracts, full articles, preprints and patents in the field of medical and life sciences. The membership of Europe PMC helps NWO and ZonMw funded researchers to make the research results openly available, according to the so-called “green route”, and to share these in open access form at a single location thereby making their work even more visible and findable.

The advantages of open access publication via Europe PMC

Europe PMC is more than just a platform. It is also a search engine that provides the richest sets of results in the area of the life sciences and medical sciences. Publications are automatically enriched or linked with information from other sources, such as preprints and information from research funding and project data or, for example, with links to underlying research data. Some publishers will automatically upload articles emerging from research funded by NWO and ZonMw to Europe PMC.
Europe PMC is pleased that NWO and ZonMw will become members of this global platform for open access publishing.

Aiming for 100% open access publishing

In 2019, the research funding agencies NWO and ZonMw endorsed Plan S with the ambition of fully implementing the principles of Plan S with effect from 1 January 2021. Plan S was drawn up by cOAlition S, a collaboration between international research funding agencies whose aim is to accelerate the transition to 100% Open Access. In recent years, NWO and ZonMw committed themselves to realising this. For example, they have both made their funding conditions stricter by stipulating that all scientific publications that emerge from research they fund should be published immediately in open access form. The membership of Europe PMC is the next step in supporting researchers to realise this and comply with the principles of Plan S.

NWO and ZonMw will soon inform researchers and other stakeholders about the way in which the services of Europe PMC can be used.

More information


Europe PMC:

NWO Open Access policy: 

  • NWO open access publiseren (NL) 
  • NWO open access publishing

ZonMw Open Access policy:

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news-6374 Mon, 19 Oct 2020 09:04:20 +0200 Largest study ever on research integrity launches, aimed at all researchers in the Netherlands https://www.zonmw.nl/nl/actueel/nieuws/detail/item/largest-study-ever-on-research-integrity-launches-aimed-at-all-researchers-in-the-netherlands/ The National Survey on Research Integrity (NSRI) is being distributed to nearly 40,000 researchers in the Netherlands starting today. The survey marks the starts of not only the largest study ever conducted, worldwide,on research integrity, but also the first and largest study to target the entire research communityin the Netherlands, acrossall disciplines. The survey seeks to sketch as accurate and complete a picture as possible of theissues that can foster or hinder research integrity, such as open science practices, competitiveness, trust in published studies, work pressure, and questionable and responsible research practices.

“We are living in a time when scientific research and outcomes are essential to making decisions that affect the general populationand our country’s welfare,” said professor Lex Bouter, project leader for the NSRI. “There is much at stake, and it is imperative that those who are relying on science can also trust our research practices.”

The NSRI is one ofthe projects in the Fostering Responsible Research Practices (FRRP) programme, conducting “research about research”and underwritten by the Dutch organisations ZonMw, the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO), and their partners. ZonMw, NWO and their partners are investing a total of 3.8 million euros over five years to realise the four pillars of the FRRP programme, of which the NSRI is one of.

According to FRRP: “By means of the NSRI, we will gain insight into the nature and causes of questionable research practices. The results will be used to implement substantiated improvements.

"Why research integrity –and why now?"


Different to ethics, research integrity generally refers to the principles and standards whose purpose it is to ensure validity and trustworthiness of research,” according to Gowri Gopalakrishna, the post-doc researcher on the NSRI team. “It has become an urgent topic not only in the Netherlands, but also worldwide, especially with the open science movement.”

Accelerated scientific publishing during the Covid-19 pandemic is an example that Bouter, Gopalakrishna and their team have cited as a reason to bring research integrity topics to the front of researchers’ attention, noting that the first four months of the pandemic resultedin muchmore related scientific publishing than in 2003 with the outbreak of SARS.

“The rapidly increasing number of publications combined with the urgency to quickly understand the new pathogen presents a significant challenge for maintaining the integrity of the underlying evidence base, and to ensure that research is conducted according to global standards of research integrity,” Gopalakrishna and Bouterargue in a commentarywritten in June 2020 for British Medical Journal Opinion.

More information
 

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news-6307 Tue, 06 Oct 2020 16:37:10 +0200 Powerful US research funder unveils strict open-access policy https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-020-02793-5?utm_source=Nature+Briefing&utm_campaign=f99132318c-briefing-dy-20201002&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_c9dfd39373-f99132318c-43672369 One of the world’s richest biomedical research organizations, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), announced on 1 October that it will require scientists it funds to make papers open access (OA) as soon as they are published — a change to its current policy, which allows a delay of up to one year before results must be free to read. news-6102 Tue, 01 Sep 2020 09:41:36 +0200 Animal-free innovations for better COVID-19 research https://www.zonmw.nl/nl/actueel/nieuws/detail/item/animal-free-innovations-for-better-covid-19-research/ This summer, 40 research projects into the coronavirus pandemic and the consequences of thisstarted with funding from the Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport. We rapidly need a lot of knowledge about the SARS-CoV-2 virus and the disease COVID-19. Animal-free models can play a role in that because the results can be better translated to humans and yield outcomes faster. Five projects with animal-free research will therefore start. In April of this year, the Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport made 40 million euros available to ZonMw and NWO for research into the coronavirus pandemic and the consequences of this for society, such as the illness COVID-19. The research results should become available as quickly as possible for everybody who has an interest in this illness: doctors and nurses, national and municipal governments, care providers and citizens. With animal-free innovations, research can be done better and faster. And that is vitally important now: the committee of the ZonMw research programme More Knowledge with Fewer Animals therefore made extra funding available to realise projects with such animal-free innovations within the research programme COVID-19. ‘I’m proud of the performance delivered by everyone involved, applicants and assessors, because an awful lot of work was realised in a short space of time’, says Dick Tommel, chair of the committee More Knowledge with Fewer Animals.

The Dutch Society for the Replacement of Animal Testing also made funding available for this call for proposals. ‘Many animal experiments are performed for research into COVID-19. We will almost certainly see that in the figures’, says Debby Weijers of the Society. ‘With this initiative, we want to contribute to COVID-19 research without animal experiments. For this disease in particular – and similar diseases in the future – we hope to achieve a lot with human models. That is because these models reveal far more accurately how the disease progresses in humans. Also, with human models, we can personalise the research, for example by using stem cells or computer simulations based on patient data. With such approaches, we can better investigate why the virus makes certain groups more ill than others. Animal models will not be able to provide an answer to these and other questions.’

Exemplary projects

In this special round, embedded in the COVID-19 call for proposals, five projects were selected that make broader use of existing animal-free innovation or make the development of new animal-free innovations possible.

A heparin puff against coronavirus infection? - Theo Geijtenbeek (Amsterdam UMC)

Theo Geijtenbeek, Professor of Molecular and Cellular Immunology at Amsterdam UMC, will lead research into the possible preventive effect of the anticoagulant low molecular weight heparin against SARS-CoV-2. Already, COVID-19 patients are now immediately administered heparin by means of injections when they are hospitalised in order to prevent blood clots. But Geijtenbeek and his group discovered that this drug also blocks the binding of the virus to cells and consequently prevents infection. Now they want to investigate whether inhaling heparin can have a preventive effect so that, for example, healthcare personnel can use a heparin inhaler to protect themselves from infection. The first step in the research is innovative, says a proud Geijtenbeek. Volunteers will be asked to inhale heparin via the nose. Subsequently, the researchers will remove some nasal mucosa cells (just like during a coronavirus test) and will subsequently expose these cells to the virus to investigate the antiviral effect of heparin. Geijtenbeek: ‘We want to do it in this way to prevent the need for animal experiments and so that we can enter the clinical phase earlier. And time is an important factor in this pandemic’. In addition, the research group will make use of a dynamic human cell model to further investigate the effect of heparin on the coronavirus infection.

A broadly applicable dynamic model – Robbert Rottier (Sophia Children’s Hospital)

A dynamic cell model is a research setup that the consortium led by Robbert Rottier, senior researcher at the Pulmonology Department of the Sophia Children’s Hospital, will use for their research. Static lung systems are used a lot in today’s coronavirus research. The disadvantage of these models is that they only simulate the functioning of human lung cells to a limited extent. Therefore, Rottier’s team, together with professor Roman Truckenmüller from Maastricht University and the MERLN Institute, will produce a closed dynamic system. They will use an existing bioreactor to simultaneously culture human cells from both the epithelium of both the respiratory passages and blood vessels. By transporting microfluids through this, a dynamic system will arise. That can be used to better study the development and progression of our infections such as COVID-19. Through the collaboration with Truckenmüller, an expert in the area of nanotechnology and biochips, and the MERLN institute, this system can also be rapidly produced at a commercial scale and made available to laboratories. The team is also working on a protocol so that the model can be used without the need for extra training. According to Rottier, working on animal-free innovations has additional advantages: ‘Since we started working on this type of innovation, we have increasingly looked for alternatives within the research group, and our use of laboratory animals has decreased.’

Combining human cell models with genetic characteristics – Jeffrey Beekman (UMC Utrecht)

Working on animal-free innovations can make researchers more aware of how they do their research. It is also what Jeffrey Beekman, Professor of Cellular Disease Models at University Medical Center Utrecht discovered. ‘Before this, I did not particularly focus on animal-free research, but the call for proposals and writing the proposal has made me more aware of this. I now pay more attention to the materials I work with, such as the human cells that originate from individuals and the serum that I use to allow those cells to grow. That serum often has an animal origin.’ For research into COVID-19, Beekman and his research team will use cell models to study how the coronavirus infection works in vivo on various organs: upper respiratory passages (nose), lower respiratory passages (lungs), intestines and kidneys. ‘By combining these models with unique genetic characteristics of the cell donors, you can compare the different tissues and discover factors that influence the effects of the coronavirus and the efficacy of the drugs used against it’, says Beekman. ‘In the case of COVID-19, that is particularly important because the virus affects various organs.’

Microchips as mini-patients with COVID-19 – Andries van der Meer (University of Twente)

How can you simulate a COVID-19 patient so that you can investigate why some patients develop blood clots? That was the question which Andries van der Meer, Associate Professor in Applied Stem Cell Technology at the University of Twente, and his team will tackle. Some 10-30% of people with COVID-19 who are hospitalised, end up developing blood clots. Consequently, this group of patients has a far worse prognosis. The basis for the project is a model of mini-blood vessels on a microchip developed by the University of Twente. By adding blood plasma from patients to this model, Van der Meer and his team hope to develop models of COVID-19 patients. These models can then be used to simulate the development of blood clots. To realise this, they sought collaboration with Saskia Middeldorp, Professor of Internal Medicine at Amsterdam UMC, and Christine Mummery, Professor of Developmental Biology at Leiden University Medical Center. For the research, it is vital that material from different patients with and without COVID-19 is used. Because why do some COVID-19 patients suffer from these clots and hypoxia, whereas others do not? These individual models will function as mini-patients on which treatments and drugs can be tested in the second phase. For Van der Meer, the use of these human models is a logical step: ‘The technology has developed in such a way over the past 5 to 10 years that we can now make models that closely resemble humans and consequently make a fast “turn-over’ towards patients. The reflex of using animal models in medical research is deeply rooted. However, with the extra tools that are now at our disposal, we can do exciting things that have added value and are animal-free.’

Better insight into lung damage due to COVID-19 – Pieter Hiemstra (Leiden University Medical Center)

Patients recover slowly from COVID-19, and it seems that both the virus and the immune system’s response to the virus cause damage to the alveoli. How do the cells that cover the respiratory passages and alveoli, the epithelial cells, respond to the virus and how does that response contribute to lung damage? These are the questions that Pieter Hiemstra, Professor of Cell Biology and
Immunology of Lung Diseases, will tackle together with his colleagues from Leiden University Medical Center. For the research, the team will make use of tested human cell models, organoids andconventional culture models. In the first phase, epithelial cells from, among other things, the nose and alveoli will be cultured to examine what the virus does with the different cell types.

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news-6091 Mon, 31 Aug 2020 09:43:46 +0200 Open Access: more impact from research https://www.zonmw.nl/nl/actueel/nieuws/detail/item/open-access-more-impact-from-research/ Open Access publishing ensures that research is quickly and easily accessible. During the coronavirus pandemic, the importance of that has become clearer than ever before. For example, doctors and patients search for information about the treatment of COVID-19. To increase the impact of knowledge, ZonMw will tighten the guidelines for Open Access with effect from 1 January 2021. What will change? Better research and more impact through Open Access

Sharing publications and data in a quick and accessible manner (Open Access) helps science, healthcare and education to progress. Doctors, patients, policymakers and professional practitioners can immediately make use of the most recent insights and data. The quality of research and data improves because colleagues can immediately examine the results published and can reproduce experiments in their own lab. It also improves national and international collaboration between researchers. Furthermore, It becomes clear at an earlier stage if something does not work, which means that research can then be adjusted or stopped. For example, it was mainly thanks to Open Access publications that the efficacy and safety of chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine as a treatment for COVID-19 patients was quickly shown to be inadequate. Jeroen Geurts, chair of the board of ZonMw: ‘The coronavirus pandemic has very clearly underlined the importance of Open Access publishing’.

Implementation of Plan S

Since 2013, ZonMw has required researchers to make all publications that emerge from research that is partially or entirely funded by ZonMw available in Open Access form. A study by the Centre for Science and Technology Studies (CWTS) reveals that in 2018 that was already the case for 60% of publications. ZonMw wants to accelerate this positive development. In mid-2019, ZonMw endorsed Plan S for Open Access. This plan has been drawn up by cOAlition S, an international collaboration of research councils, with the aim of realising 100% Open Access. Just like NWO, ZonMw will implement the guidelines from Plan S this year.

Direct 100% Open Access from 1 January 2021 onwards

The principles of Plan S apply to all call proposals that ZonMw publishes with effect from 1 January 2021. Therefore, compared to 2020, ZonMw will further tighten the guidelines. In practice, this means, for example, that there is free access to the publications and no embargo period between the date of publication in a journal and the publication being freely accessible online. Publication will also be under a Creative Commons licence, enabling sharing/reuse of results. Also retainment of copyright by authors or institutes will be aimed for.

Obstacles to overcome

Many researchers already publish in Open Access form but not in all cases and not always directly. The implementation of Plan S will therefore provide researchers from ZonMw projects opportunities but also obstacles that need to be overcome. For example, researchers experience that large sums sometimes have to be paid for Open Access publishing. That problem is currently being worked on, for example through national agreements between universities and publishers. ZonMw will also examine possible solutions to this problem. Rob Diemel, ZonMw coordinator Open Science: ‘ZonMw wants encourage Open Access via several routes so the project leaders can make their own choices. For example, in new funding rounds from 2021 onwards, applicants can include a post in the project budget for publication via the so-called full golden route (publications that are immediately free and accessible for everybody ). We will also facilitate the green route by offering researchers access to a repository that is frequently used worldwide. This will lead to the more rapid spread of research results and will offer researchers greater visibility.’

Open Access to utilise knowledge in society

Even though the transition from publishing behind paywalls to Open Access is a difficult process, Jeroen Geurts also sees that researchers are increasingly embracing Open Access: ‘Of course, researchers also feel the need to allow their findings to be used by society. In the case of COVID-19 research programmes, you can see that there is a considerable amount of expertise in the Netherlands to counteract the medical and non-medical negative effects of COVID-19. Rapid access to each other’s research and being able to make use of each other’s research is vitally important for researchers, especially if they are working in a race against the clock.’

Recognising and rewarding researchers

Open Access also requires a different way of recognising and rewarding researchers. Open Access publications are easy to find, are cited more often and have a greater reach. It is important that researchers are rewarded for the quality of their research and its importance for science and/or society, and not for controversial indicators such as the journal impact factor and H-index. Therefore, from 2021 onwards, the DORA (Declaration on Research Assessment) principles will be used in the assessment and selection of ZonMw funding proposals. Amongst other things, that should lead to another way of recognising and rewarding researchers.

Requiring but also informing and facilitating

During the course of 2020, ZonMw will mainly focus on implementing the guidelines from Plan S and informing and advising researchers and project teams about the Open Access publication of their research. The ZonMw Open Access team will also facilitate this implementation by including the guidelines and the processes and thoroughly preparing ZonMw employees for these changes so that they can help applicants. All of the information can be found on the ZonMw website and, of course, if you have any questions, you can contact the employees of the Open Access team.

More information

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news-5750 Tue, 02 Jun 2020 11:00:00 +0200 Heading for 100% Open access: NWO and ZonMw on the right track, but further steps are needed https://www.zonmw.nl/nl/actueel/nieuws/detail/item/heading-for-100-open-access-nwo-and-zonmw-on-the-right-track-but-further-steps-are-needed/ In 2018, 68% of the publications resulting from NWO funding were Open access. The percentage for ZonMw was 60%. These are the findings of an analysis published today by the Centre for Science and Technology Studies (CWTS). NWO and ZonMw are aiming for 100% Open access. Achieving this target will require an extra effort and further steps. On behalf of NWO and ZonMw, CWTS analysed how many NWO and ZonMw publications were Open access between 2015 and 2018. The CWTS also looked at the different types of Open access (gold, green, hybrid, etc.). Since 2009, NWO has been committed to ensure all publications resulting from NWO funding are made available in Open access. In 2015, NWO made further agreements on this with the State Secretary at the time, Sander Dekker. CWTS used the bibliographic database Web of Science and Unpaywall for its analysis.

The study’s most important findings are as follows:

  • Between 60% and 70% of the publications published between 2015 and 2018 are available as open access, either via a repository (green route) or in a fully Open access journal or hybrid journal.
  • 80% of the publications of NWO institutes are openly available, mainly via the green route.
  • On average, Open access publications funded by NWO and ZonMw have a higher citation impact than publications behind a paywall.

Stan Gielen (chair of NWO): “These are excellent figures. They show that we were on the right track in 2018 with almost 70% Open access. To achieve 100%, we will have to step up our efforts, however. From 1 January 2021 onwards, we will introduce Plan S. As the CWTS report demonstrates, a more stricter way of monitoring compliance might  help in that respect. Where publications are not available in Open Access at the end of the project, we are going to request researchers to correct that by depositing their publications through their institutional repository. Remember that with the Taverne amendment, copyright law gives every Dutch author the right to openly share their work. So there is absolutely no reason whatsoever not to do that.”

Jeroen Geurts (chair of ZonMw): “At ZonMw, we will also use 2020 to tighten up our Open access policy. The principles of Plan S will apply to all calls for grants open from 1 January 2021 onwards. And we will actively help researchers to make Open access publishing possible.”

Note:
This CWTS analysis only concerns Open access publications from NWO and ZonMw. The report is a baseline measurement that will be carried out annually from now on. VSNU publishes figures on Open access publications throughout the Netherlands.

More information:

 

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news-5616 Sat, 25 Apr 2020 11:56:32 +0200 Details COVID-19 research programme (“second wave”) now online https://www.zonmw.nl/nl/actueel/nieuws/detail/item/details-covid-19-research-programme-second-wave-now-online/ Today we published the COVID-19 research programme (“second wave”). The programme has three focus areas:

  1. Predictive diagnostics and treatment
  2. Care and prevention
  3. Societal dynamics

For each focus area, an expert panel will prioritise the research subjects in a very short space of time. The composition of these expert panels will be published next week on the programme page of ZonMw. Once the expert panels have determined the research subjects, the focus areas in the calls for proposals will be elaborated. The programme has three funding possibilities: urgent research questions track, bottom-up funding track and policy and professional practice boosts track. Within the urgent research questions track, the projects must be assessed and started very quickly. That requires a strongly abridged procedure. For this track, ZonMw will invite research groups to submit a proposal. The bottom-up funding track will be open for a short time (two weeks) for the submission of project ideas within the themes prioritised by the expert panel. This track will also use an accelerated procedure. For the policy and professional practice boosts, the programme has a budget for small projects and studies up to a maximum of €25,000. How this track will be given form has yet to be determined.
Further information about focus areas and the funding instruments can be found in the programme text.

Timetable

The current timetable is given below. For the most recent timetable, please see the programme page.

  • We will shortly invite the research groups for the urgent research questions track. The first grants within this track will be announced in mid-May.
  • The call for proposals for the bottom-up funding track focus areas 1 and 2 will be published on the ZonMw and NWO grant calendars no later than 1 May.
  • On 6 May, we will publish the call for proposals for the bottom-up funding track focus area 3 and for the policy and professional practice boosts on the ZonMw and NWO websites.
  • It is expected that the first projects from the bottom-up funding track will be granted at the end of June/start of July.

More information

(all the information will be available in English before 1 May)

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news-5575 Wed, 15 Apr 2020 13:44:44 +0200 First approved research projects subsidy scheme COVID-19 https://www.zonmw.nl/nl/actueel/nieuws/detail/item/first-approved-research-projects-subsidy-scheme-covid-19/ Eight projects that will have a direct effect on the course of the coronavirus outbreak (COVID-19) and public health will soon be starting. This is the first result of the commission of the Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport to ZonMw to finance critical research with a direct impact on the current corona pandemic. Top priority, quick action needed

Subjects have been inventoried and prioritised by an expert panel. Eight topics have been given top priority because they may have a direct impact on public health. Specific researchers were then asked to submit a research proposal on these topics. This (very) short application procedure was chosen because it was necessary to act quickly. Subsidies were granted to eight studies. A total budget of 5.5 million euro has been made available for this.

Funded projects

The projects that received an incidental subsidy cover the following subjects:

  1. 1Investigation into the course of the disease, long-term prognosis, cross-reactivity, re-infection, and the course of the immune response over time in relation to prognosis. To this end, a cohort of persons who have recovered from COVID-19 (RECoVERED study) will be followed.
  2. Research into carrier status, burden of disease and transmission from and to children (CoKids study).
  3. Research in the field of hospital epidemiology to support infection prevention measures (COCON study)
  4. A pharmacotherapeutic trial with anakinra in COVID-19 patients in intensive care (ANACOR-IC).
  5. Mapping virus evolution, spreading and transmission via sequencing to predict transmission routes.
  6. Social science research into the impact of social isolation on vulnerable populations and what support vulnerable groups need.
  7. Trial of chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine treatment in patients admitted for moderate to severe COVID-19 (ARCHAIC study).
  8. Drug development: studies into the safety and efficacy of antibodies to the coronavirus.

Almost all of the projects involve partnerships between several university medical centres, universities and other research institutions. It is important that they can start as soon as possible. More detailed project information can be found at https://www.zonmw.nl/en/about-zonmw/coronavirus/research-on-corona-and-covid-19/

Action and research programme COVID-19 and other grant possibilities

In addition to the incidental subsidies already provided, there are more granting possibilities. In order to meet the high demand for solutions and answers, ZonMw will soon start the research programme COVID-19 on behalf of VWS and together with NWO. This programme is aimed at preventing or reducing the negative effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, combating the pandemic and the social dynamics resulting from the pandemic. In this programme we make use of various granting mechanisms, including more open calls for proposals. These calls will appear on the ZonMw subsidy calendar. More information will follow in April.

Besides these initiatives, a scheme aimed at small projects with practical solutions for material shortages and other practical problems in and outside hospitals had also recently been started. In addition, the SET scheme was expanded. Both schemes have since been closed to new applications. The Virus Outbreak Data Access Network (VODAN) implementation network was also launched.

Important: Open access publications, especially at this time

Researchers are obliged to make all publications arising from scientific research that has been subsidised in whole or in part within this scheme immediately accessible through Open Access (without embargo) with an open license. In this way, we share new knowledge, that can contribute to improving public health regarding COVID-19, as quickly as possible. In addition, research results produced within this programme should be shared in line with the Joint statement on sharing research data and findings relevant to the novel coronavirus (nCoV) outbreak.

More information about ZonMw and the coronavirus

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